Does school really determine ones intelligence

  • Absolutely Not, Grades Merely Reflect Basic Understanding.

    Ok, I am 19 years old and have a very high IQ, but my grades definitely do not reflect it. Because it was evident at a young age that I was way beyond an average student I was pulled out of class to participate in classes that were grades above me. I was the only one who got to do this. I pick up instruments without having played before, and I was able to read at an 8th grade level in the 2nd grade. This was positive at the time, but it became immensely detrimental later. I truly believed that I was special and that studying meant you were not smart enough. All through school I never had to really try, until I moved schools. The teachers did not know how smart I was and I had to prove it. I soon was put in all the gifted student classes but I was very bored with with work. The only subject I was not sufficient in was math because it required a lot of studying. Math was my first B ever. I was depressed because I believed they I was not good at math, but really, a B is an okay grade off someone who came to class after not really studying and just looked for patterns to solve the problems. At this point in my life I am at a prestigious college but I find it difficult. All the Information has to be memorized an I have had little practice in that. My advice to parents is, don't let your child feel too special. Make them work hard to get better and smarter because although intelligence can be measured, that does not mean one can not improve. Intelligence is something that must be exercised like a muscle. No grades to not reflect intelligence, but it is the people who make the grades that succeed.

  • Cause i is black

    No, I don't think grades determine intelligence. Grades are often based on arbitrary criteria. One person can do really well in certain subjects and very poorly in others, just simply by showing up. What's important is that an individual learns the processes that lead to the proper answer. Putting in the effort to learn something, even if you ultimately get the answer wrong, is more important to development than simply guessing and getting the right answer. This is why many professors will give almost full credit for a wrong answer as long as the student has shown their work

  • Grades are more a sign of effort

    Grades received are more a sign of effort then intelligence. Some intelligence is shown but it is more effort. I'm okay with it being this way because school is not about intelligence but also hard work and doing your best. Those that do their best should be rewarded with higher grades.

  • Grades are based on tests of memory, not intelligence

    Grades are based on tests. Tests are given to see how much you have memorized in a certain subject. Just because you do poorly on a test does not determine your intelligence. It just shows that you didn't retain much of a certain subject. Grades should be based on effort more than memorization because it messes with a student's head, making them feel worthless, when, in fact, they could actually be very intelligent, just a bad test taker or bad at memorization.

  • One can get good grades yet not be quite as intelligent.

    I have known many students and peers who have good grades yet do not possess practical intelligence. Some examinations require one to have good test taking skills and not particularly tests a person's intelligence. If someone knows how to take an exam, you can easily answer questions without prior knowledge of the material. Also examinations do not necessarily tests one's ability to do a certain task at hand. If one puts a lot of effort in studying, one can achieve good grades. Such is the case of many classes that require rote memorization, a more effort based learning approach.

  • Effort determines grades

    It's backwards, effort determines grades. You can very intelligent but if you don't do the work you will get a bad grade. Although intelligence would determine how much or little effort, but then it depends on whether you are intelligent at the thing being studied or if you are not.

  • Effort determines intelligence.

    No, I don't think grades determine intelligence. Grades are often based on arbitrary criteria. One person can do really well in certain subjects and very poorly in others, just simply by showing up. What's important is that an individual learns the processes that lead to the proper answer. Putting in the effort to learn something, even if you ultimately get the answer wrong, is more important to development than simply guessing and getting the right answer. This is why many professors will give almost full credit for a wrong answer as long as the student has shown their work.

  • Just take Thomas Edison.

    I don't think anyone here will say that he was stupid, But that is exactly what his grades said in his school. Yes, Thomas Edison failed his class 2 because he was "too stupid to learn anything". He was fired from his first two jobs because he was "not working productively enough". Now, This is the person who invented the first version of that bulb above you, And he failed 999 times before it came on for about two minutes. I sincerely believe he was so not stupid, But his grades said otherwise. Our education system has not changed much so even today you can be "too stupid to learn anything", As some people called Edison, But in other areas you might be the most intelligent person in history.

  • Grades don't say anything about your intelligence

    So all my friends have rlly good grades and I am the one with a C in math, And one of my best friends of has an 97% in math said to me "its okay, Grades don't determine if your smart" honestly grades are rlly just what you can memorize and put effort into everybody thinks that your grade needs to be high in order to be smart but noooo that's not true! If you have a bad grade, Academics just probably isn't your thing

  • Intelligence has nothing to do with grades

    Grades cannot measure a students intelligence or effort. Albert Einstein once said, “Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, It will live its whole life believing it is stupid. ” This is often attributed to our education system, Where students are measured, Not by art or logic, But by math and science. These are the things that the education system uses to deem someone intelligent, Or unintelligent. But how could just those aspects of intelligence really show how smart someone is when there are so many more?
    According to psychologist Howard Gardner, In his book, Frames of Mind: The Theory of Intelligences, There are 9 types of intelligence.
    Naturalist Intelligence: Someone with naturalist intelligence is good at understanding surroundings, When things shift, Where they go, What they’re doing. These people are exceptional at surviving in the wild.
    Musical Intelligence: These people are better at understanding things with sounds. Rhythm, Tone, And pitch are often strong suits for people with musical intelligence.
    Logical Mathematical Intelligence: Someone who has logical mathematical intelligence has both mathematical intelligence and good reasoning skills. They are good at considering hypothesis, Carrying out calculations, And quantifying data.
    Existential Intelligence: Having existential intelligence usually means that one is very philosophical, They are good at thinking about questions that may not have a real or definite answer.
    Interpersonal Intelligence: These people are good at communicating with others, And good at noticing changes in mood and motive. Someone who has interpersonal intelligence can see things from multiple perspectives, This gives them high empathy, And helps them to do well in socially oriented work.
    Bodily-Kinesthetic Intelligence: A person with this kind of intelligence loves movement, They have high body awareness and motor skills, And they normally do better in activities involving movement. These people better learn things by doing them and experimenting.
    Linguistic Intelligence: If someone has linguistic intelligence, It means that they are probably better at noticing small differences. They tend to pick up new words and languages quicker, And would make excellent journalists, Teachers, Or public speakers. They have a broader vocabulary, And are attracted to language related activities.
    Intrapersonal Intelligence: A person who has strong intrapersonal intelligence is often good at understanding their own feelings and thoughts, And are good at working with them to achieve goals without the need of any reward. These people make good philosophers and psychologists.
    Spatial Intelligence: This kind of intelligence makes a person very good at mental manipulation of physical perspectives. This means they are good at map reading, Jigsaw puzzles, And drawing shapes from different perspectives without seeing it from that perspective. Someone with high spatial intelligence are less likely to get lost, And can find their way through a maze efficiently.
    With this many kinds of intelligence, Theory or fact, How is it possible for the school system to say that a student is intelligent or not based on grades that do not reflect these kinds of intelligences?